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Plenary Speakers

Caleb Behn is Eh-Cho Dene and Dunne Za/Cree from the Treaty 8 Territory of Northeastern BC. He has recently graduated from the University of Victoria with a Juris Doctor degree and is among the first UVic Law students granted the Concentration in Environmental Law and Sustainability. Prior to law school, he was the Oil and Gas Officer for the West Moberly First Nations and a Lands Manager for the Saulteau First Nations.

Caleb is the principal player / subject of the documentary "Fractured Land: The Story of Our Nation at the Crossroads" (http://fracturedland.com/), an activist and and engaged, smart and inspiring speaker.

 

Photo Credit: "Fractured Land".

 

 

Jessica Danforth and Billy Ray Belcourt from The Native Youth Sexual Health Network (NYSHN).The NYSHN is an organization by and for Indigenous youth that works across issues of sexual and reproductive health, rights, and justice throughout the United States and Canada. NYSHN are resistors of violence from the state, violence on the land, and violence on bodies. Restoration of knowledge, justice, and ways to be safer in communities is critical to their work. And yes, resistance is sexy!

 

 

Dr. Sirma Bilge is Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology at Université de Montréal. She is also the Associate Editor of the Journal of Intercultural Studies, elected secretary of the Research Committee on Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations (RC05) of the International Sociological Association (ISA), and elected Regional Representative for Canada of the ISA Research Committee on Women in Society (RC32).

Holding a PhD from Université Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle (Paris), in Études du monde Anglophone (Studies of the English-Speaking World), with a specialization in Canadian studies, Dr. Bilge teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on gender and sexualities, ethnic relations, postcolonial and decolonial theories, and cultural studies, and developing a new research seminar on intersectionality (for Summer 2015, Université de Montréal). She also founded and directed the Intersectionality Research Unit at the Centre des études ethniques des universités montréalaises (CEETUM) from 2005 to 2010. Her Ph.D. thesis, Post-migratory Ethnic Communalisations: The Case of 'Turks' in Montreal, published in French (CEC-Sorbonne Nouvelle, 2004), won the inaugural Best Doctoral Thesis Award in Canadian Studies, granted by the International Council for Canadian Studies.

Her work engages with the intersecting politics of the nation and the governmentality of immigration and integration in their particular articulations around the regimes of gender and sexual normativities across the western world with a specific focus on Quebec/Canada. Recent publications include articles and chapters on sexual nationalism, racialized governmentality of immigration-integration, the whitening of intersectionality, non-oppressive coalitional politics, and incorporation of minority knowledges in academia. Her work have been published in various scientific journals such as Du Bois Review, Politikon, Journal of Intercultural Studies, Diogenes, International Journal of Canadian Studies, and Sociologie et sociétés. She is currently working, with co-author Patricia Hill-Collins, on a manuscript on Intersectionality in contract with Polity Press (Key Concepts).

Recent (last two years) and forthcoming publications include:

Chapters:

  • S. Bilge. “Whitening Intersectionality. Evanescence of Race in Current Intersectionality Scholarship”, IN Wulf D. Hund & Alana Lentin (eds), Racism Analysis Yearbook 2014, Berlin : Lit Verlag/Routledge (forthcoming).
  • S. Bilge. "Why do critical ethnic studies matter? And why they should matter to sociology" IN Stephan Gervais, Raffaele Iacovino, and Mary Anne Poutanen (eds), Living in Québec: A Reader in Intercultural Relations. McGill-Queen's (forthcoming).
  • S. Bilge. 2014. "Harvesting the Generous Crop of the Québécois Reasonable Accommodation Controversy", IN Fethi Mansouri & Boulou Ebanda B'beri (eds), Global Perspectives on the Politics of Multiculturalism in the 21st Century (Routledge).
  • S. Bilge. 2012. "Developing Intersectional Solidarities: A Plea for Queer Intersectionality", IN Malinda Smith & Fatima Jaffer (eds), Beyond the Queer Alphabet: Conversations in Gender, Sexuality and Intersectionality. Teaching Equity Matters E-book series, University of Alberta.

Articles:

  • S. Bilge. “La pertinence de Hall pour l’étude de l’intersectionnalité”, (“The Relevance of Hall for the Study of Intersectionality”) Nouvelles pratiques sociales, Intersectionality special issue (forthcoming)
  • S. Bilge. 2013. "Intersectionality Undone: Saving Intersectionality from Feminist Intersectionality Studies", Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race, (Carbado, Crenshaw, Mays & Tomlinson, eds), Intersectionality special issue, 10(2): 405-424.
  • S. Bilge. 2013. "Reading the Racial Subtext of the Québécois Accommodation Controversy: An Analytics of Racialized Governmentality", Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies 40(1): 157-181.
  • S. Bilge. 2012. "Mapping Quebecois Sexual Nationalism in Times of Crisis of Reasonable Accommodations", Journal of Intercultural Studies 33(3): 303-318.

 

 

Maria Campbell is a writer, playwright, and teacher. She started her career in 1973 when she published her first book, Halfbreed. That book has become a literary classic and continues to be one of the most widely taught texts in Canadian literature. Professor Campbell has also written four children's books. Her most recent book, Stories of The Road Allowance People, translates oral stories into print and is being re-published.

Professor Campbell has received numerous awards, including the National Aboriginal Achievement Award, the Gabriel Dumont Order of Merit, the Chalmers Award for best new play, and a national Dora Mavore Award for playwriting. She has been inducted into the Saskatchewan Theatre Hall of Fame and was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2008.

Maria Campbell retired from the University of Saskatchewan where she taught native studies, creative writing and drama. She is currently the Elder in Virtual Residence at the Centre for World Indigenous Knowledge and Research, Athabasca University. She holds four honorary doctorate degrees and has served as writer and playwright in residence at numerous universities, public libraries, and theatres.

She has worked as a volunteer with women and children in crisis for over forty years and is co-founder of a halfway house for women in Edmonton as well as an emergency crisis centre for women and children Until recently, Maria Campbell's home was a safe house for youth.

She is a mom, grandma and great-grandma.

 

 

Karma R. Chávez is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Arts and affiliate in the Program in Chican@ and Latin@ Studies and the Department of Gender and Women's Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is co-editor of Standing in the Intersection: Feminist Voices, Feminist Practices (with Cindy L. Griffin, SUNY Press, 2012), and author of Queer Migration Politics: Activist Rhetoric and Coalitional Possibilities(University of Illinois Press, 2013). Karma is also co-founder of the Queer Migration Research Network (queermigration.com), a member of the radical queer collective Against Equality, and Wednesday’s host of the radio program, "A Public Affair" on Madison's community radio station, 89.9 FM WORT.

Recent Publications:

Co-editor of Standing in the Intersection: Feminist Voices, Feminist Practices (with Cindy L. Griffin, SUNY Press, 2012), and author of Queer Migration Politics: Activist Rhetoric and Coalitional Possibilities (University of Illinois Press, 2013).

 

 

Jin Haritaworn is Assistant Professor of Gender, Race and Environment at York University in Toronto. Prior to this they held postdocs and fellowships at the London School of Economics, Goldsmiths College and Helsinki University. They are the editor or co-editor of several journal special issues and books on the intersection of gender, sexuality and race, including Queer Necropolitics (Routledge), ‘Murderous Inclusions’ in the International Feminist Journal of Politics (both with Adi Kuntsman and Silvia Posocco), and ‘Women’s Rights, Gay Rights and Anti-Muslim Racism in Europe’ in the European Journal of Women’s Studies. They are author of the book, The Biopolitics of Mixing: Thai Multiracialities and Haunted Ascendancies (Ashgate, 2012). A second monograph, Queer Regenerations: Innocent Lovers, Hateful Others and Shrinking Urban Space, is forthcoming with the Pluto (2014).

Recent Publications:

  • Queer Necropolitics, Edited by Jin Haritaworn, Adi Kuntsman, Silvia Posocco (Routledge, 2014)
  • Queer Regenerations: Innocent Lovers, Hateful Others and Shrinking Urban Space (forthcoming Pluto, 2014)
  • Murderous Inclusions , special issue in International Journal of Feminist Politics, 15, 4 (December 2013), (edited with Silvia Posocco and Adi Kuntsman)
  • The Biopolitics of Mixing: Thai Multiracialities and Haunted Ascendancies (Ashgate, 2012).
  • Women’s rights, gay rights and anti-Muslim racism in Europe, special focus in European Journal of Women’s Studies, 19, 1/2, (2012)
  • On the depoliticisation of intersectionality talk: conceptualising multiple oppressions in critical sexuality studies (with Umut Erel, Encarnación Gutiérrez Rodríguez, and Christian Klesse. In: Yette Taylor,; Sally Hines and Mark E. Casey,eds. Theorizing Intersectionality and Sexuality. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, pp. 56–77.
  • Gay Imperialism: Gender and Sexuality Discourse in the ‘War on Terror. (with Tamsila Taugir and Esra Erden). In: Adi Kuntsman and Esperanza Miyake, eds., Out of Place: Interrogating Silences in Queerness/Raciality (2008).

Jin Haritaworn is Assistant Professor of Gender, Race and Environment at York University in Toronto. Prior to this Jin held postdocs and fellowships at the London School of Economics, Goldsmiths College and Helsinki University. Author of the book The Biopolitics of Mixing: Thai Multiracialities and Haunted Ascendancies (Ashgate,2012), asecond monograph titled Queer Lovers and Hateful Others is in contract with the Pluto series ‘Decolonial Studies, Postcolonial Horizons’. Jin is the editor and co-editor of several special issues and books on the intersection of gender, sexuality and race, including Queer Necropolitics (Routledge),and ‘Murderous Inclusions’ in the International Feminist Journal of Politics (both with Adi Kuntsman and Silvia Posocco), ‘Women’s Rights, Gay Rights and Anti-Muslim Racism in Europe’ in European Journal of Women’s Studies and ‘Polyamory and Non-Monogamies’ in Sexualities.

Recent Publications:

The Biopolitics of Mixing: Thai Multiracialities and Haunted Ascendancies (Ashgate, 2012). A second monograph titled Queer Lovers and Hateful Others (contract with the Pluto series ‘Decolonial Studies, Postcolonial Horizons’).
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Kiera L. Ladner is Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Politics and Governance and an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Studies at the University of Manitoba. In 2010 she edited a collection on Oka@20 with Leanne Simpson entitled This is an Honour Song: Twenty Years Since the Blockades (Arbeiter Ring Press, 2010) and is currently writing a book on Indigenous constitutions and constitutional politics tentatively entitled This is Not a New Book. Her current projects include: the Indigenous Leadership Initiative; a project on Constitutional renewal in Canada, Australia and New Zealand; the creation of an Indigenist research network between the University of Manitoba and the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand; a collaborative project examining the impact of residential schools and day schools on Indigenous governance, political traditions, and philosophies; a collaborative community based project (Mahikani Wikowin Kotawan) with Rocky Cree or Asiniskowithini Acimowin; and, a project on mobilizing political resurgence and decolonization in Canada and Hawai’i. Other research interests include self-determination, Indigenous political thought, federalism, social movements and gender diversity.

Recent Publications:

Co-Edited This is an Honour Song: Twenty Years Since the Blockades (Arbeiter Ring Press, 2010) and is currently writing a book on Indigenous constitutions and constitutional politics tentatively entitled This is Not a New Book.

 

 

Dr. Tracey Lindberg is a citizen of As'in'i'wa'chi Ni'yaw Nation Rocky Mountain Cree (the Kelly Lake Cree Nation). She has law degrees from the University of Saskatchewan and Harvard University and a doctorate of laws from the University of Ottawa. Currently, she holds a Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, Legal Orders and Laws at Athabasca University. She is the recipient of a number of academic scholarships and awards including a doctoral award from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Governor General’s Gold Medal at the University of Ottawa. Her research interests include Indigenous traditional law, anti-colonial theory, critical legal theory, Aboriginal business and economic development, Aboriginal women’s issues, and law and literature. A grassroots Indigenous rights and Indigenous citizens’ advocate, Dr. Lindberg is particularly interested in working with Indigenous Elders, students and traditionalists in the reinvigoration of Indigenous legal traditions. Professor Lindberg has also published in literary journals and is a blues singer. She has a novel coming out with Harper Collins in June.

Selected Publications

  • Lindberg, Tracey, Ed., Discovering Indigenous Lands: The Doctrine of Discovery in the English Colonies (with Jacinta Ruru, Larissa Behrendt, Robert Miller) (Oxford University Press, 2011).
  • Lindberg, Tracey, Ed., Canadian Woman Studies, special issue, “Indigenous Women in Canada: The Voices of First Nations, Inuit and Métis Women,” 26, nos. 2/3 (Winter/Spring 2008).
  • Lindberg, Tracey. “Indigenous Distance Education” (with Priscilla Campeau and Janice Makokis), Cultural Survival Quarterly, 27, 4 (Winter 2003)
  • Lindberg, Tracey. “Essential Readings on Race and the Law,” Labour/Travail, 47 (Spring 2001), 185-202, available online: http://journals.hil.unb.ca/index.php/LLT/article/view/5224/6093

Dr. Tracey Lindberg is a citizen of As'in'i'wa'chi Ni'yaw Nation Rocky Mountain Cree (the Kelly Lake Cree Nation). She has law degrees from the University of Saskatchewan and Harvard University and a doctorate of laws from the University of Ottawa.  Currently, she holds a Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, Legal Orders and Laws at Athabasca University.

She is the recipient of a number of academic scholarships and awards including a doctoral award from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Governor General’s Gold Medal at the University of Ottawa.

Her research interests include Indigenous traditional law, anti-colonial theory, critical legal theory, Aboriginal business and economic development, Aboriginal women’s issues, and law and literature.  A grassroots Indigenous rights and Indigenous citizens’ advocate, Dr. Lindberg is particularly interested in working with Indigenous Elders, students and traditionalists in the reinvigoration of Indigenous legal traditions.

Professor Lindberg has also published in literary journals and is a blues singer.
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Suvendrini Perera completed her PhD at Columbia University, New York, and her BA at the University of Sri Lanka, Kelaniya. She is Professor of Cultural Analysis in the School of Media Culture & Creative Arts at Curtin University and Deputy Director of the Australia-Asia-Pacific Institute in Perth, Australia. She is author or editor of six books, including Living Through Terror (with Antonio Traerso, 2013), Australia and the Insular Imagination: Beaches, Borders, Boats and Bodies (2009), and Asia & Pacific Inscriptions: Identities, Ethnicities, Nationalities (1995). She is currently working on an Australian Research Council grant, Old Atrocities, New Media. In addition to the co-edited anthology At the Limits of Justice (with Sherene Razack, 2014) she is working on a monograph on war, media and mobility.

Recent Publications

  • Perera, Suvendrini and Sherene Razack, Eds., At the Limits of Justice: Women of Colour on Terrorism (University of Toronto Press, 2014).
  • Perera, Suvendrini and Antonio Traverso, Eds., Living Through Terror (Routledge 2013).
  • Perera, S. A. “Oceanic Corpo-graphies, Refugee Bodies and the Making and Unmaking of Waters.” Feminist Review, 103, (2013): 58-79
  • Perera, Suvendrini A. “Missing in Action.” Borderlands eJournal 11, (2012).
  • Perera, Suvendrini A., and J. Pugliese, “White Law of the Biopolitical.” Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia 3, 1 (2012): 87-100.
  • Perera, Suvendrini A. “Sri Lanka: Landscapes of Massacre” (215-43). In Torture: Power, Democracy and the Human Body, Ed. Shampa Biswas and Zahi Zalloua (Seattle and London: University of Washington Press, 2011).
  • Perera, Suvendrini A. 2011. “Death in a Dry River: Black Life, White Property, Parched Justice.” Somatechnics, 1, 1 (2011): 65-86.
  • Perera, Suvendrini A. “Uncivil Zones: Terror and Territoriality in the Geopolitical Shadowlands” (31-47). In: International Relations and States of Exception. Margins, Peripheries and Excluded Bodies, Eds. Shampa Biswas and Sheila Nair. (London: Routledge, 2010).
  • Perera, Suvendrini A. “Torturous Dialogues: Geographies of Trauma and Spaces of Exception.” Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies 24, 1 (2010): 31-45.
  • Perera, Suvendrini, Australia and the Insular Imagination: Beaches, Borders, Boats and Bodies (Palgrave MacMillan, 2009).

 

 

Sherene Razack is a full professor in the Department of Social Justice Education, at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. She has published At the Limits of Justice: Women of Colour On Terror (2014, ed. With Suvendrini Perera); States of Race (2011, co-editor with Malinda Smith and Sunera Thobani); (2008) Casting Out: Race and the Eviction of Muslims From Western Law and Politics; (2004) Dark Threats and White Knights: The Somalia Affair, Peacekeeping and the New Imperialism. (2002, Editor) Race, Space and the Law: Unmapping a white settler society. Toronto: Between the Lines; (1998) Looking white people in the eye: gender, race and culture in courtrooms and classrooms; (1991) Canadian feminism and the law: The women's legal education and action fund and the pursuit of equality. She is a founding member of Researchers and Academics of Colour for Equality.

Recent Publications:

At the Limits of Justice: Women of Colour On Terror (2014, ed. With Suvendrini Perera); States of Race (2011, co-editor with Malinda Smith and Sunera Thobani

 

 

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is “a gifted writer who brings passion and commitment to her storytelling and who has demonstrated an uncommon ability to manage an impressive range of genres from traditional storytelling to critical analysis, from poetry to the spoken word, from literary and social activism.” In 2014, Leanne was named the inaugural RBC Charles Taylor Emerging writer by Thomas King, and she was also nominated for a National Magazine Award for her short story “Treaties” published in Geist 90. In 2012, she won Briarpatch Magazine’s Writing From the Margins prize for short fiction. Leanne is the author of three books; Dancing on Our Turtle’s BackThe Gift Is in the MakingIslands of Decolonial Love, and the editor of Lighting the Eighth Fire, This Is An Honour Song (with Kiera Ladner) and The Winter We Danced: Voice from the Past, the Future and the Idle No More Movement (Kino-nda-niimi collective). Leanne holds a PhD from the University of Manitoba and has lectured at universities across Canada. She is of Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg ancestry and a member of Alderville First Nation.

Recent Publications:

  • Islands of Decolonial Love, 2013.
  • The Winter We Danced
  • Voices From the Past, the Future, and the Idle No More Movement by The Kino-nda-niimi Collective (Editor), 2014.
  • Dancing On Our Turtle's Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence, and a New Emergence, 2011.

 

 

Andrea Smith is associate professor of Ethnic Studies and Media and Cultural Studies at University of California, Riverside. She received her Ph.D. in History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz in 2002. Previously, she taught in the Program in American Culture at the University of Michigan. Her publications include: (co-edited with Audra Simpson), Theorizing Native Studies (Duke, 2014), Native Americans and the Christian Right: The Gendered Politics of Unlikely Alliances (Duke, 2008), and Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide (South End Press, 2005). She is also the editor of The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Nonprofit Industrial Complex (South End Press, 2009), and co-editor of The Color of Violence, The Incite! Anthology (South End Press, 2006). She is a co-founder of Incite! Women of Color Against Violence. She recently completed a report for the United Nations on Indigenous Peoples and Boarding Schools.

Recent Publications

  • Simpson, Audra and Andrea Smith, Eds., Theorizing Native Studies (Duke, 2014)
  • Smith, Andrea. “Voting and Indigenous Disappearances,” Settler Colonial Studies, 3, 3-4 (2013): 352-68.
  • Smith, Andrea. “Life after Tenure Denial” (195-204). In: Mentoring Faculty of Color: Essays on Professional Development and Advancement in Colleges and Universities, Eds. Dwayne Mack, Elwood D. Watson and Michelle Madsen Camacho (McFarland & Company Inc., 2013).
  • Smith, Andrea. “Against the Law: Indigenous Feminism and the Nation-State,” Affinities: A Journal of Radical Theory, Culture, and Action, 5, 1 (2011).
  • Smith, Andrea. “Unsettling the Privilege of Self-Reflexivity” (263-80). In: Geographies of Privilege, Eds. france winddance twine and Bradley gardener (New York: Routledge, 2010).
  • Smith, Andrea. “Indigenous Peoples and Boarding Schools: A Comparative Study,” Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, 8th Session, New York, 18-29 May 2009 (E/c.19/2009/CRP.1, 26 January 2009), pp. 1-59.

 

 

Malinda S. Smith is the 2014 Conference Convenor and on the national Steering Committee of the R.A.C.E. Network. She is an associate professor of international relations and comparative politics in the Department of Political Science at the University of Alberta. Dr. Smith has worked in the areas of equity, human rights and social justice theory, policy and practice for over 20 years. She served as the vice-president (Equity Issues Portfolio) for the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences (2008-12). She is the past Chair of Equity for the Association of Academic Staff University of Alberta. Previously she served on the Boards of the Centre for Race and Culture, Alberta Advisory Council on the Status of Women, the Northern Alberta Alliance on Race Relations, and the Parkland Institute. She co-founded the Anti-Racism and Decolonization Network; and co-sponsored a new section, ‘Race, Ethnicity, Indigenous Peoples and Politics: Race, Ethnicité, Peuples Autochtones et Politique’, within the Canadian Political Science Association. Dr. Smith is the editor of Globalizing Africa (2003); Beyond the ‘African Tragedy’: Discourses on Development and the Global Economy (2006); and Securing Africa: Post-9/11 Discourses on Terrorism (2010) and co-editor of States of Race: Critical Race Feminism (2010) and Critical Concepts: An Introduction to Politics (2013). She has published a number of book chapters and articles including, “Commissioning ‘Founding Races’ and Settler Colonial Narratives” (2014), “Africa, 9/11, and the Temporality and Spatiality of Race and Terror” (2014), “A Genealogy of Poverty” (2013), and “Race Matters and Race Manners” (2004). She is a co-investigator on the SSHRC-funded research on ‘Racialization, Racism and the University"’ (2009-14).

 

 

Sunera Thobani is Associate Professor at the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia, Canada. Her research focuses on critical race, postcolonial and feminist theory, globalization and violence, citizenship, migration, Muslim women, the War on Terror, and media. Her book, Exalted Subjects: Studies in the Making of Race and Nation in Canada, was published by the University of Toronto Press (2007); she has also co-edited Asian Women: Interconnections (Canadian Scholars’ Press, 2005) and States of Race: Critical Race Feminist Theory for the 21st Century (Between the Lines, 2010). Her scholarship has also been published in peer-reviewed journals including Borderlands, the International Journal of Communication, Race & Class, Feminist Theory, Canadian Journal of Women and the Law, Atlantic, Meridiens and Refuge.

Dr. Thobani served as Director of the Race, Autobiography, Gender and Age (RAGA) Centre at the University of British Columbia (2008-12), where she organized numerous projects on equity, diversity and social justice. She is a founding member of the Researchers and Academics of Colour for Equity (RACE), a cross-Canada network that promotes the research and scholarship of academics of colour and of Indigenous Ancestry.

Dr. Thobani was the Ruth Wynn Woodward Endowed Professor in Women's Studies at Simon Fraser University (1996-2000) and also a past President of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women (NAC), Canada’s then largest feminist organization (1993-1996). She has helped organize and spoken at numerous international conferences, including the NGO Forum at the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, China; the First International Women's Conference on APEC in Manila, Philippines; the first Asian-Pacific Women’s Conference in the US, and the National Association of Black, Asian and Ethnic Minority Councilors; the Women’s Forum against the World Trade Organization (Seattle, US) and the Black Feminism conference in the UK. She has also been a Visiting Scholar at Delhi University (Delhi, India), Bilgi University (Istanbul, Turkey), the London School of Economics (London, UK), the Indian Institute of Advanced Study (Shimla, India), the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies (UBC, Canada), the Lansdowne Scholar in Residence at the School of Social Work, University of Victoria (Canada), and the Robert Sutherland Visitor at Queen’s University (Canada). Dr. Thobani is committed to using an interdisciplinary approach in her teaching and research, and to maintaining her involvement in community and social justice organizations and activities.

Recent Publicatons:

States of Race: Critical Race Feminist Theory for the 21st Century (Between the Lines, 2010).

 

 

Rinaldo Walcott is an Associate Professor and Director of Women’s and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. He is a member of the Department of Social Justice Education at OISE, as well as the Graduate Program in Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto. His teaching and research is in the area of black diaspora cultural studies and postcolonial studies with an emphasis on questions of sexuality, gender, nation, citizenship and multiculturalism. From 2002-2007 Rinaldo held the Canada Research Chair of Social Justice and Cultural Studies where his research was funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Canadian Foundation for Innovation and the Ontario Innovation Trust.

Rinaldo Walcott is the author of Black Like Who: Writing Black Canada (Insonmiac Press, 1997 with a second revised edition in 2003); he is also the editor of Rude: Contemporary Black Canadian Cultural Criticism (Insomniac, 2000). As well Rinaldo is the Co-editor with Roy Moodley of Counselling Across and Beyond Cultures: Exploring the Work of Clemment Vontress in Clinical Practice (University of Toronto Press, 2010).

Currently, Rinaldo is completing Black Diaspora Faggotry: Readings Frames Limits, which is under-contract to Duke University Press. Additionally Rinaldo is co-editing with Dina Georgis and Katherine McKittrick No Language Is Neutral: Essays on Dionne Brand forthcoming. As an interdisciplinary black studies scholar Rinaldo has published in a wide range of venues. His articles have appeared in journals and books, as well as popular venues like newspapers and magazines, as well as other kinds of media.

 

 

Dr. Stan Wilson, B.A. (U of Saskatchewan 1968), Ph.D. (University of California, Santa Barbara 1989). Stan is a member of the Opaskwayak Cree Nation where he spent his formative years. He has experience teaching at all levels of education including primary, elementary and high school both in the public system and on First Nations. He has been a school board member, a member of the Board of Regents at the U of Winnipeg, a school principal, superintendent of education, a consultant to provincial Departments of Education in Manitoba and Saskatchewan and Dean of Education at the University College of the North. As a university professor Stan conducted research and taught at Brandon University, the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, California State University in Sacramento, the Saskatchewan Indian Federated College and at the University of Alberta, where he co-founded the First Nations Graduate Education Program. He was also co-founder (with his wife Peggy) of the Land Based Masters Degree offered at the University of Saskatchewan. Stan works from within an Indigenous paradigm, promoting and encouraging Aboriginal people, including students, to honour and utilize their own unique knowledge base. Bilingual in Cree and English, he is currently retired from the U of A but serves on the Governance Committee of the Opaskwayak Cree Nation, and as adjunct faculty at several Canadian universities. He works extensively across Canada, the United States and Australia conducting Cultural Awareness training, staff development seminars and Cree language immersion programs.

 

 

Gisèle Yasmeen has worked in research and higher education for more than 20 years. She has undertaken and managed research and related activities across sectors, and has published widely as well as provided regular media commentary. Her work has taken her all over Canada and around the world. Before joining the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council in 2007 as founding Vice-President of Partnerships and, as of 2010, founding Vice-President of Research, Gisèle worked in a number of executive positions in the world of research. She left SSHRC in January 2014 to begin a new life back on the west coast with her family.

Gisèle has a PhD from UBC, an MA from McGill and a BA Honours from the University of Ottawa.

Recent Publications:

Article on scholarly & research infrastructure for new edition of the International Encyclopedia for the Social & Behavioural Sciences.

Forthcoming policy brief on street vending in Thailand for WIEGO (www.wiego.org).